All current encryption methods will be broken “instantly” in 5 years’ time…

So says Head of IBM Research, Arvind Krishna. To be clear that would be all current encryption methods based on large prime numbers. Think Public-Key Cryptography.  Quantum computing, a concept developed since 1980s, has taken massive leaps forward during the past couple of years, as technologies have advanced. Quantum computing isn’t a “holy grail” for all kinds of computer solutions, but it is a technology that is extremely powerful in handling massive, large numbers. The problem? All modern encryption techniques are based on large numbers, namely, large prime numbers.  Well, not really.  Some solutions promise to be “Quantum-Resistant”…

Lattice-based cryptography already exists and is gaining traction.  The VooDoo is also continually refining our OTPSME solution which is as of this post, unbroken.

SOURCE – AfterDawn.com

The latest from Q branch – self-destructing electronics…

Friends, time to get your 007 on!  Engineers have developed a new kind of “transient electronics”, which are designed to disappear when they’re no longer needed.  This new class of electronics can dissolve and disappear on a pre-set schedule, within a few minutes or a few years, depending on when you want them to go away. They could live in the body and deliver drugs, they could stick on the exterior of buildings or tanks, and they can become compost instead of metal scrap.

The applications are endless but here’s a list of other items that have been built so far: transient transistors; diodes; wireless power coils; temperature and strain sensors; photodetectors; solar cells; radio oscillators and antennas; and digital cameras. There is a huge array of possible uses for this technology, which is partly funded by our friends at DARPA.  Pretty cool stuff!

SOURCE – Popular Science

Scientists Store One Bit of Data on a Single Atom…

Friends, file this one under “Wow”.  IBM researchers just discovered a way to store data on a single atom.   Data storage is undergoing dramatic evolution, recently researchers successfully stored digital data — an entire operating system, a movie, an Amazon gift card, a study and a computer virus — in strands of DNA.

The IBM researchers have developed the world’s smallest magnet using a single atom and they packed it with one bit of digital data.  Currently, hard drives use about 100,000 atoms to store a single bit of information — a 1 or 0 — using traditional methods.   So, this breakthrough could allow people to store 1,000 times more information in the same amount of space in the future applications.

The discovery, which was described in the journal Nature, builds on 35 years of nanotechnology history at IBM, including their Nobel prize-winning scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that was used to build the atomic hard drive.  The scientists used a single atom of the rare earth element holmium and carefully placed it on a surface of magnesium oxide, which makes its north and south poles hold in a stable direction. The two stable magnetic orientations define the 1 and 0 of the bit.   The researchers then used a very accurate, sharp, and small, needle to pass an electrical current through the holmium atoms that flips its north and south poles, thus replicating the process of writing binary data (1s and 0s) to a traditional magnetic hard drive.

SOURCE: The Hacker News

LavaBit Relaunches

LavabitFriends, back in 2013, we told you about how Ladar Levison, founder of the encrypted email service Lavabit, took the defiant step of shutting down the company’s service rather than comply with a federal law enforcement request that could compromise its customers’ communications.  The FBI had sought access to the email account of one of Lavabit’s most prominent users — Edward Snowden. Levison had custody of his service’s SSL encryption key that could help the government obtain Snowden’s password. And though the feds insisted they were only after Snowden’s account, the key would have helped them obtain the credentials for other users as well.  Rather than undermine the trust and privacy of his users, Levison ended the company’s email service entirely, preventing the feds from getting access to emails stored on his servers. But the company’s users lost access to their accounts as well.  Levison, who became a hero of the privacy community for his tough stance, has spent the last three years trying to ensure he’ll never have to help the feds break into customer accounts again.

Lavabit is relaunching with a new architecture that fixes the SSL problem and includes other privacy-enhancing features as well, such as one that obscures the metadata on emails to prevent government agencies like the NSA and FBI from being able to find out with whom Lavabit users communicate. He’s also announcing plans to roll out end-to-end encryption later this year, which would give users an even more secure way to send email.  The new service addresses what has become a major fault line between tech companies and the government: the ability to demand backdoor access to customer data. Last year when the FBI sought access to an iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooter, Apple couldn’t get into the phone because the security scheme the company built in to the device prevented it from unlocking the phone without the shooter’s password. (Eventually, the FBI found another way to access the phone’s data, ending the dispute with Apple.)

SOURCE – The Intercept

Carnegie Mellon researchers visualize way to fend off DDoS attacks

Friends, this is some cool tech… Carnegie Mellon’s CyLab Security and Privacy Institute is touting research that provides visualization of the reams of network traffic data (i.e., IP addresses and time stamps) that IT and security analysts typically examine. This makes it easier to spot DDoS patterns.  “Visualization is one way to change abstract data into pictures, sound, and videos so you can see patterns in a very intuitive way”, so says Senior Systems Scientist Yang Cai of CyLab’s Visual Intelligence Studio.  Check out a demonstration below…

SOURCE: NetworkWorld.com

  • Ads