The latest from Q branch – self-destructing electronics…

Friends, time to get your 007 on!  Engineers have developed a new kind of “transient electronics”, which are designed to disappear when they’re no longer needed.  This new class of electronics can dissolve and disappear on a pre-set schedule, within a few minutes or a few years, depending on when you want them to go away. They could live in the body and deliver drugs, they could stick on the exterior of buildings or tanks, and they can become compost instead of metal scrap.

The applications are endless but here’s a list of other items that have been built so far: transient transistors; diodes; wireless power coils; temperature and strain sensors; photodetectors; solar cells; radio oscillators and antennas; and digital cameras. There is a huge array of possible uses for this technology, which is partly funded by our friends at DARPA.  Pretty cool stuff!

SOURCE – Popular Science

MRAM – Semiconductors that run forwards and backwards?

Magnetic RAM (MRAM) could one day break modern encryption methods.  So says Engineers from Purdue University and University of California at Berkeley.

Modern encryption relies upon the fact that certain mathematical operations are inherently difficult to undo with an inverse action. Current generation hardware typically has a set of inputs and a set of outputs to handle the computation required by encryption algorithms. Importantly, there is no way to reverse the actions performed in hardware without major efforts and a lot of time.

Circuits have been designed to have an adjustable degree of randomness. The device has been named a P-bit to note the controlled probability of the output.  P-bits can be combined to build logic gates and arithmetic circuits capable of performing inverse operations. Circuits that act as adders can be made to perform subtractions while multiplier circuits can factor out products.

Pushing a stream of random bits into the output of a logic gate will cause the inputs of the gate to reveal what inputs would produce the output presented. With enough combinations fed through a circuit in reverse, the original input data can be found exponentially faster than traditional brute force methods.


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