Scramblecode, a security-oriented Programming Language

Friends, this looks really interesting…

Adding to the existing portfolio of some 700 programming languages is a new release candidate for Scramblecode, a security-oriented offering from Danish software vendor ProgramPartner ApS.  Scramblecode  is all about encryption and safety.

Scramblecode is an easy to learn programming language based on curly brackets and classes,” the company says on its Web site. “It uses encrypted compilation to secure the code, and protects the execution while working with encrypted variables.

The company today announced release candidate 1 (RC1) for Scramblecode, which is available for download and testing that can be done completely off-line on a variety of machines.  The Scramblecode package comes with its own IDE, including a code editor, test bench and debugger. The company said that because Scramblecode implements memory encryption, ordinary debugging and memory analysis tools aren’t effective. Built for Windows development, Scramblecode lets coders load a virtual machine (VM) into memory to execute private assembler instructions and it individually protects each instruction and works with encrypted variables in memory. Furthermore, an attack that cracks just one instruction (or even one bit) could crash program execution.

SOURCE – ADTMag.com

Email Encryption Service Provider ‘ProtonMail’ Now on Tor

ProtonMail-Tor-ServiceIf you look in the VooDoo Tech section, you’ll see we endorse both ProtonMail and Tor.  Both are excellent services if you value your online privacy and now they work together!  ProtonMail, launched in 2014 by a group of MIT and CERN experts, is the largest email encryption service provider in the world having more than two million users. It is the preferred emailing platform of activists and journalists who need to keep information confidential.  In its latest announcement, ProtonMail’s co-founder Dr. Andy Yen stated that they would allow the users to directly access their email accounts via Tor network so that they could counter steps taken by authoritative governments across the globe to minimize user privacy.

Dr. Yen said that it is inevitable to avoid censorship in some countries and they have been “proactively working to prevent this.” Dr. Yen further acknowledged that the reason why they have chosen Tor is that “Tor provides a way to circumvent certain Internet blocks so improving our compatibility with Tor is a natural first step.”

This perhaps looks like a step taken after the recent actions from the governments to curb the public’s access to encrypted platforms and secure internet usage. Such as Egyptian government blocked encrypted chat application Signal and the UK government’s approval of the Investigatory Powers Bill aimed at tracking the activities of web browsers.  Friends, do yourself a favor… Use Tor and get yourself a ProtonMail account.

SOURCE – Hackread.com

Carnegie Mellon researchers visualize way to fend off DDoS attacks

Friends, this is some cool tech… Carnegie Mellon’s CyLab Security and Privacy Institute is touting research that provides visualization of the reams of network traffic data (i.e., IP addresses and time stamps) that IT and security analysts typically examine. This makes it easier to spot DDoS patterns.  “Visualization is one way to change abstract data into pictures, sound, and videos so you can see patterns in a very intuitive way”, so says Senior Systems Scientist Yang Cai of CyLab’s Visual Intelligence Studio.  Check out a demonstration below…

SOURCE: NetworkWorld.com

Metal Foam? In Body Armor?

Metal_FoamEver heard of “Composite Metal Foams” (CMFs)?  Turns out, this technology has been around for quite a while and has a wide range of applications.  These materials are tough enough to turn an armor-piercing bullet into dust on impact but weigh a fraction of plate armor.

Afsaneh Rabiei, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NC State, has spent years developing CMFs. The video below shows a specimen made out of her composite metal foams. The bullet in the video is a 7.62 x 63 millimeter M2 armor piercing projectile, which was fired according to the standard testing procedures established by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ).  As you can see, the results were dramatic.

“We could stop the bullet at a total thickness of less than an inch, while the indentation on the back was less than 8 millimeters,” Rabiei says. “To put that in context, the NIJ standard allows up to 44 millimeters indentation in the back of an armor.”

Check it out:


SOURCE: NC State University

Quantum Chess?

quantum_atomFriends, The next generation of chess is here, and it involves Quantum Mechanics.  Say what?  As if the game isn’t difficult enough. Quantum Chess incorporates principles of quantum mechanics, such as superposition and entanglement, into regular chess gameplay. For example, a piece can exist in two places at the same time (superposition) until the player’s opponent observes the piece by moving another piece into one of the spaces that it might occupy, collapsing the quantum field and forcing it to exist in either one location or the other. And two pieces can become entangled when one piece tries to move through another that happens to be in superposition, joining their fates.  The ultimate goal of the game is to kill the opponent’s king, not to reach checkmate. This is some pretty deep stuff; check it out…

A quick primer on Quantum Chess Paul Rudd vs Stephen Hawking Quantum Chess match

SOURCE – USC.edu

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